<p>View of Carlingford from the sea</p>

View of Carlingford from the sea

Memories

Frances Taylor

29 January 2017

ooooh the smell of Mrs Harolds shop. Anybody remember...?More > (0 comments)

Kevin Woods

29 January 2017

McArdles TV
We didn't have a televison in 1954 and very few people did.Des Boyle was the local stockist and he had his Radio Bicycle and TV shop in Newry St.in the house where Michael Thornton now lives.
It was a pretty new invention then ,black and white pictures and loads of fuzziness on a jumping screen for the most part.
As children we would all head up to Tommy and Eli Mc Ardles drapery shop in Newry St to see it.
If Eli was there you would pass by the counter and into the back with miriads of other children.The woman must of had the patience of Job.

You had to there by 5 oclock to see Crackerjack presented by Eamon Andrews.It was game that required contestants to answer questions ,if they missed one a cabbage or broom was put into their arms,if they dropped one they were eliminated.
.Tom, Laurence, and Dessie, had the chairs, the rest all sat on the floor in the half dark mesmerised by the miricle that was television.
6 o clock came all to quickly and it was home for tea bread jam and a boiled egg and all set to listen to the radio at 6.45 and the adventures of Dan Dare Pilot of the Future.More > (0 comments)

Kevin Woods

29 January 2017

We were playing football in the school yard in 1955.The yard was in that area that is now the Church parking area beside the Parochial House.We had been fortunate today that we had acquired a cows bladder from Woods' butcher shop in Newry St.It was blown up and tied at the top with string.Two teams were picked and the match was on. The football's origins added to our hilarity as the game ebbed and flowed across the school yard.
Lunch time had another 6 minutes to run.The game slowed as the players moved to the southern wall to look towards the bottom of the hill.
Many prayed silently that this was the day when the teachers house door wouldn't open.
Every day we prayed but everyday on the dot of five minutes to two the door opened and Master Mc Grath proceeded on his onward march towards us up the hill.In what seemed like seconds his soft felt hat boobed up and down along the perimiter wall with each menacing step.He was at the gate,turned and without looking left or right proceeded to the classroom door.Wheeling round to face us I knew our time was up as we lined up two by two. "Istigh"(In) he said as every gut in my body churned in anticipation of the afternoon to come.More > (0 comments)

Tom McKevitt

29 January 2017

An excerpt taken from the"McKevitt Family” Web site
Tom McKevitt now lives in Blue Ridge Georgia U.S.A.
A note from Tom McKevitt:
MCKEVITT IS MY NAME, Thomas Lawrence McKevitt but I’m called Tom. I'm your host, and I'm pleased to bring you The McKevitt Family web site. "McKevitt Family" is intended to mean all who are named McKevitt, or are of McKevitt families around the world; and that because McKevitts everywhere are indeed of one family.
My father grew up in Chelsea, Massachusetts, and I in the Roslindale/West Roxbury section of Boston. I made my first personal appearance at Brigham & Women's Boston Lying Inn, where it was claimed in song that "...every day is Labor Day at the Boston Lying Inn...," in late February 1930, amid the Great Depression that followed an October 1929 market crash. My father was Francis John McKevitt, my mother Gertrude Josephine McKevitt, nee Clifford. I was born the youngest of three; Lawrence "Larry" Timothy McKevitt being the eldest, Paulina Agnes Maloney, nee McKevitt and called Pam, being the middle child. My grandfather, Patrick McKevitt, grew up in a place called the North Commons, between the medieval town of Carlingford and the townland of Omeath, in County Louth, Ireland. For some reason, rather than walk a mile on Sundays and Holy Days to St. Michael's Catholic Church in Carlingford, he preferred walking about three miles to St. Laurence Catholic Church, in Omeath. His father was called "Big Arthur," and his mother was the former Catherine Henry, daughter of Patrick and Catherine Henry. Yes, Patrick Henry. The Henry family lived closer to St. Laurence's, and also near Newry, close to the Lough.More > (1 comments)

Ann Hanway nee Curran

29 January 2017

When I visited Carlingford in Summer 2008 I realised it was almost 50 years since I left to live in England.
So many changes (for the better) in the old town but I had plenty of memories from school days at the 'old' school beside the Church.
My granfather was James O'Hare, Dundalk St.(brother of 'big'Hugh O'Hare) My mother was Molly O'Hare Curran sister of John O'Hare who lives in Dundalk.
I lived in Dundalk St., with my grand parents, James & Minnie O'Hare, my uncles John & Jimmy, Aunt Lily. Aunt Gertie and my mother, Molly were away nursing.
I got to hear of your web site via a friend who lives in Birmingham England. I now live in Melbourne,Australia and scrolling through the photo gallery was a real treat.Thank you Kevin for your hard work and for the historical info ..brilliant More > (0 comments)